Attracting Pollinators

Ben HenryMay 17, '20
Attracting Pollinators

Pollinators are essential to food and flower crops. Eighty percent of all flowering plants rely on pollinators for survival! The world’s bees are in peril, it’s estimated 1/3 of the population is gone due to pesticides and diseases.

Inter–plant some pollinators to benefit your fruit trees and gardens. Plant flowers in a range of shapes and sizes; include varieties that bloom throughout the season. Avoid chemical pesticides and herbicides. Provide a water source, a little mud puddle works great. Leave small piles of twigs and brush for nesting and over wintering.

The list below offers a good mix of plants for pollinators; please add some to your gardens to help out!

Plants that Attract Pollinators

  • Aster
  • Bachelor’s Button
  • Basil
  • Bee Balm
  • Black–eyed Susan
  • Blanket Flower
  • Borage
  • Butterfly Bush
  • Candytuft
  • Catmint
  • Catnip
  • Clematis
  • Coneflower
  • Coreopsis
  • Cornflower
  • Cosmos
  • Cotoneaster
  • Currant
  • Dame’s Rocket
  • Dill
  • Elder
  • Evening Primrose
  • Flase Indigo
  • Fennel
  • Foxglove
  • Giant hyssop
  • Globe thistle
  • Goldenrod
  • Heliotrope
  • Horehound
  • Huckleberry
  • Hydrangea
  • Hyssop
  • Joe–pye weed
  • Lantana
  • Larkspur
  • Lavender
  • Lobelia
  • Lupine
  • Marjoram
  • Mint
  • Oregon grape
  • Parsley
  • Penstemon
  • Phlox
  • Pin Cushion Flower
  • Plumbago
  • Pot marigold
  • Poppy
  • Rhododendron
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Salvia
  • Snowberry
  • Stonecrop sedum
  • Sunflower
  • Sweet William
  • Thyme
  • Verbena
  • Viola
  • Wallflower
  • Wild Buckwheat
  • Willow
  • Zinnia