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Attracting Pollinators

Pollinators are essential to food and flower crops. Eighty percent of all flowering plants rely on pollinators for survival! The world’s bees are in peril, it’s estimated 1/3 of the population is gone due to pesticides and diseases.

Inter–plant some pollinators to benefit your fruit trees and gardens. Plant flowers in a range of shapes and sizes; include varieties that bloom throughout the season. Avoid chemical pesticides and herbicides. Provide a water source, a little mud puddle works great. Leave small piles of twigs and brush for nesting and over wintering.

The list below offers a good mix of plants for pollinators; please add some to your gardens to help out!

Plants that Attract Pollinators

  • Aster
  • Bachelor’s Button
  • Basil
  • Bee Balm
  • Black–eyed Susan
  • Blanket Flower
  • Borage
  • Butterfly Bush
  • Candytuft
  • Catmint
  • Catnip
  • Clematis
  • Coneflower
  • Coreopsis
  • Cornflower
  • Cosmos
  • Cotoneaster
  • Currant
  • Dame’s Rocket
  • Dill
  • Elder
  • Evening Primrose
  • Flase Indigo
  • Fennel
  • Foxglove
  • Giant hyssop
  • Globe thistle
  • Goldenrod
  • Heliotrope
  • Horehound
  • Huckleberry
  • Hydrangea
  • Hyssop
  • Joe–pye weed
  • Lantana
  • Larkspur
  • Lavender
  • Lobelia
  • Lupine
  • Marjoram
  • Mint
  • Oregon grape
  • Parsley
  • Penstemon
  • Phlox
  • Pin Cushion Flower
  • Plumbago
  • Pot marigold
  • Poppy
  • Rhododendron
  • Rose of Sharon
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Salvia
  • Snowberry
  • Stonecrop sedum
  • Sunflower
  • Sweet William
  • Thyme
  • Verbena
  • Viola
  • Wallflower
  • Wild Buckwheat
  • Willow
  • Zinnia
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